Dear Readers,

It’s always a delight to read Warren Buffett’s letter to Berkshire Hathaway’s shareholders. This time it’s no different. For your reference I have attached the file with this post and at the same time produced below his views on Investment in equities Vs fixed income securities, on market volatility, active trading and business acquisition criteria.

Warren Buffett’s views on equity investment Vs fixed income securities

Investment in equities Vs fixed income securities – Our investment results have been helped by a terrific tailwind. During the 1964-2014 period, the S&P 500 rose from 84 to 2,059, which, with reinvested dividends, generated the overall return of 11,196% shown on page 2. Concurrently, the purchasing power of the dollar declined a staggering 87%. That decrease means that it now takes $1 to buy what could be bought for 13¢ in 1965 (as measured by the Consumer Price Index).

There is an important message for investors in that disparate performance between stocks and dollars. Think back to our 2011 annual report, in which we defined investing as “the transfer to others of purchasing power now with the reasoned expectation of receiving more purchasing power – after taxes have been paid on nominal gains – in the future.

The unconventional, but inescapable, conclusion to be drawn from the past fifty years is that it has been far safer to invest in a diversified collection of American businesses than to invest in securities – Treasuries, for example – whose values have been tied to American currency. That was also true in the preceding half-century, a period including the Great Depression and two world wars. Investors should heed this history. To one degree or another it is almost certain to be repeated during the next century.

On stock market volatility – Stock prices will always be far more volatile than cash-equivalent holdings. Over the long term, however, currency-denominated instruments are riskier investments – far riskier investments – than widely-diversified stock portfolios that are bought over time and that are owned in a manner invoking only token fees and commissions. That lesson has not customarily been taught in business schools, where volatility is almost universally used as a proxy for risk. Though this pedagogic assumption makes for easy teaching, it is dead wrong: Volatility is far from synonymous with risk. Popular formulas that equate the two terms lead students, investors and CEOs astray.

It is true, of course, that owning equities for a day or a week or a year is far riskier (in both nominal and purchasing-power terms) than leaving funds in cash-equivalents. That is relevant to certain investors – say, investment banks – whose viability can be threatened by declines in asset prices and which might be forced to sell securities during depressed markets. Additionally, any party that might have meaningful near-term needs for funds should keep appropriate sums in Treasuries or insured bank deposits.

For the great majority of investors, however, who can – and should – invest with a multi-decade horizon, quotational declines are unimportant. Their focus should remain fixed on attaining significant gains in purchasing power over their investing lifetime. For them, a diversified equity portfolio, bought over time, will prove far less risky than dollar-based securities.

On active trading in stocks – Investors, of course, can, by their own behavior, make stock ownership highly risky. And many do. Active trading, attempts to “time” market movements, inadequate diversification, the payment of high and unnecessary fees to managers and advisors, and the use of borrowed money can destroy the decent returns that a life-long owner of equities would otherwise enjoy. Indeed, borrowed money has no place in the investor’s tool kit: Anything can happen anytime in markets. And no advisor, economist, or TV commentator – and definitely not Charlie nor I – can tell you when chaos will occur. Market forecasters will fill your ear but will never fill your wallet.

Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger’s criteria for business acquisitions

We are eager to hear from principals or their representatives about businesses that meet all of the following criteria:

  1. Large purchases (at least $75 million of pre-tax earnings unless the business will fit into one of our existing units),
  2. Demonstrated consistent earning power (future projections are of no interest to us, nor are “turnaround” situations),
  3. Businesses earning good returns on equity while employing little or no debt,
  4. Management in place (we can’t supply it),
  5. Simple businesses (if there’s lots of technology, we won’t understand it),
  6. An offering price (we don’t want to waste our time or that of the seller by talking, even preliminarily, about a transaction when price is unknown).

Our View: We believe the 4 points highlighted by us in green are important not just from the point of entire business acquisitions, but also from the point of minority passive investment in stocks.

Download Here:Warren Buffett’s 2014ltr

Best Regards,
Ekansh Mittal
http://www.katalystwealth.com/
Ph.: 0512-6050062, Mob: +91-9818866676
Email: info@katalystwealth.com